Down, Sick and Alone in Mexico

I doubt many of us are really prepared for the serious medical emergency while we are traveling. No matter how well prepared or how seasoned a traveler, when the doctors say “surgery,” you quake inside.

One Saturday evening in my second week on Oaxaca, I became doubled up with intestinal cramps and pain that lasted all night. It let up a bit and so I waited till Monday to go to the doctor. He listened to my symptoms and said “amoeba.” I took the prescribed meds and nothing changed. The pain was acute.

I found another doctor who again treated me for amoeba, and still there was no change. Now it was getting worrisome, and I was getting scared. After a series of tested, including a colonoscopy which could not be finished because of severe and infected blockage, my doctor started mention “surgery.”

This is when the alone part of traveling alone became an issue. First, of course, alone is not the way to be for a medical emergency, especially one that takes you into the finer workings of a foreign medical system. You need someone to talk to and to go to the doctor’s with you, because in the circumstances, your judgement may not really be the best. Hand holding is called for, and someone to talk you off the ledge of extreme fear. Someone soothing who will both let you cry and talk you out of weeping.

Second, in many countries, including Mexico, you are expected to have someone at the hospital with you, and someone to care for you post-operation. Of course everyone back home is working, or if they aren’t, like say a young adult grandson, they don’t have a passport. I checked in with everyone. I got lots of sympathy and concern and apologies for not being available, but it isn’t the same and doesn’t help you with the practicalities of recovery.

So here I was alone and afraid. Between the pain fear, I was crying a lot. A neighbor helped me some with diagnostic appointments, which was helpful, but I didn’t really know her. I sure could not ask her to help me through the whole process.

But it ended up not being necessary to have help this time. My condition started improving, which seems to have had something to do with the total cleansing necessary for the aborted colonoscopy. Between the colonoscopy and a cat scan a few days later, I had started healing. It was then that the doctor told me he had been convinced it was cancer, but it wasn’t, and I was healing well.

This, of course, has been a learning experience. I guess the most important consideration is whether or not you are comfortable having surgery in a developing country. If my cat scan had shown the same condition that the colonoscopy did, then for sure they would have wanted to operate pretty immediately. To go to the US for the surgery, where I have no established relationship with a doctor or medical system, would have postponed things for too long. But everyone was encouraging me to do just that. My doctor assured me that the surgeon here was excellent, and I have been assured by many that the hospital is very good.

Insurance is another issue. For me, at least. I travel “bareback,” meaning I have no medical insurance except for Medicare in the US. Self insuring is good for doctor’s visits and such, but surgery is a different story. My doctor told me the whole thing would be under $2000 US. I have set aside savings with exactly this eventuality in mind. Fortunately all of the testing and the doctor’s visits came to under $300.

I was extremely lucky. First and foremost because I found a doctor who had trained in the US, and who had grown up there. He has practiced in Oaxaca for over 20 years, so he is totally integrated, and integral to, the local medical establishment. His English is spoken with no accent and he understands the needs of American patients. In case you find yourself needing a doctor in Oaxaca, his name is Alberto Zamacona, and most call him Doctor Z.

I was lucky beyond what I every could have expected by having recovered without having surgery. For that I am grateful both to the ministrations of my doctor, and to my excellent immune system. I have been stunned by my recovery.

So, that was my month in Oaxaca. Now I have a couple of weeks left to enjoy the beautiful city and get acquainted with more than the medical system.

 

 

4 thoughts on “Down, Sick and Alone in Mexico

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